Author Archives | Rohan Pai

Welfare spending and the EU: is austerity now a permanent economic adjustment?

The debate over the European Union suffers from one perennial pitfall – views quickly become contentious when the question is posed of whether collaborative efforts to reform individual countries’ relationship with the EU are advisable, or whether a more hard-line stance needs to be taken. Unfortunately, any suggestions for reform themselves can often be ignored […]

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The possibility of Scottish independence: is the ‘One Nation’ notion in peril?

Alex Salmond’s white paper, entitled ‘Scotland’s Future’, seems to have attracted a lot of media coverage – but it whiffs of both (self-)importance and an sense of underwhelming implausibility. There are two issues that Salmon has tackled in this white paper. Firstly he tackles the elephant in the room, Scottish independence from the UK. He […]

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A pan-European far right: an internal risk the EU cannot take

After the banking crisis and global recession came to the fore in 2007, analysts and commentators across Europe forecasted that the Euro would collapse, and that this would lead to the gradual collapse of the European Union itself. However, time has told that this is not the case. Despite relative success, the pan-European solidarity is […]

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Euroscepticism: the spectre that compromises the UK’s economy

If there is one thing that stands out as extraordinary in this debate, it is the assertions put forward by the UK’s Chancellor George Osborne. He constantly claims that the recent crisis was caused completely by the irresponsibility of the Brown government, and uses this as his primary line of defence when tackling the popular backlash […]

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EU and US surveillance: invasion of privacy vs. preservation of security

As an introductory disclaimer, it is undeniable that most democratic countries and its citizens who hold liberty in high regard will support the idea of a right to privacy and its conceptual sister, the right to information. By contrast, the emergence of news that the NSA tapped into technology and cyber-data with the supposed assurance […]

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Going gaga over Malala: the non-violent crusader of the 21st century

The Taliban has tried to kill her; the UN has listened to her impassioned speech on the inviolable importance of equal education; she even nearly won the Nobel Peace Prize (but let’s face it – she’s better than that!) Malala Yousafzai has now cemented her image as the Joan of Arc of the modern era. […]

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Could the Department for International Development still learn a thing or two about global education reform?

Since 2010, the Department for International Development (DfID) has taken a controversial decision to pump foreign aid into low-cost private schools in developing countries (Nigeria, Ghana and Pakistan, to name a few) due to a need for investment in public education systems that, if anything, are growing exponentially. This move sparks a change in mentality for […]

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Pope Francis: a modern representative of God?

In a recent interview with a Jesuit journal in Italy, Pope Francis declared that he wants to establish a “new balance” in the Catholic Church by encouraging more involvement from women in key decisions and a less perjorative focus on the LGBT community, divorce and abortion. The Pope called for the Catholic Church (and wider […]

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From India with Love: how the Reserve Bank of India is giving freedom to investors

This article is intended to be a short update as a first-hand witness in India scrutinising the various views of investment here. As I write from the Pai family home in the centre of Mumbai, I notice just how much inflation has affected the retail market, which I like to observe so closely (having bought […]

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The EU’s Free Trade Agreement: can the moral dilemma be easily solved?

The beginning of this month marked an EU free trade agreement with Colombia and Peru to liberalise trade in the agricultural, manufacturing and fisheries industries. This is the first of what is predicted to be several deals with South American nations. Free trade has always been vociferously supported by neo-liberal, free-market capitalists, and the European Parliament is […]

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